Tropical Depression Ida will not directly hit the Seacoast but its final track will determine how much rain falls Wednesday night into Thursday.

The remnants of storm which punished the Gulf Coast are pushing to the northeast and are on a track to stay south of New England which would bring 1-3 inches of rain to the Seacoast comparable to a "warm season nor'easter."

But the track is not yet locked in.

"The heaviest rain is projected to stay to our south, although a shift north in track will bring heavier rain to southern New Hampshire" according to the National Weather Service in Gray, Maine.

A shift to the north could mean four inches of rain falls in some spots.

A Flash Flood Watch was issued for Rockingham, Strafford and York counties for late Wednesday night into Thursday afternoon for possible flooding of smaller rivers and streams. Flooding of urban and poor drainage flooding is also possible.

The rain will come to an end by early Thursday afternoon although skies will remain cloudy with cool temperatures around 70.

Unitil workers have joined over 25,000 utility workers from 32 states helping restore power to 1.1 million customers without power, according to the utility. Eversource workers were also headed to Virginia.

Eversource crews in Harrisonburg, VA late Monday night (Eversource)

Contact reporter Dan Alexander at Dan.Alexander@townsquaremedia.com or via Twitter @DanAlexanderNH

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